Gendered Threads of Globalization (GToG)

Textile Crossings in Asia Pacific, March 27-29, 2020

University of Victoria and Legacy Art Gallery

Photograph: Copyright by Maritime City Photography and used with permission

Who makes our clothing?

Who makes our clothing? How has the shift from artisanal production to “fast fashion” over the past century and a half devalued women’s textile labor in Asia? How are textile/ garment laborers and the organizations that support them preserving and reviving heritage traditions across Asia? Gendered Threads of Globalization: 20th c. Textile Crossings in Asia Pacific (GToG) unites scholars, activists, artists, and policy makers from across North America, Asia, and Europe for a 3 day symposium dedicated to these issues. Events include panels, roundtables, film screenings, interactive workshops, and artistic performances.  

How has the shift from artisanal production to “fast fashion” over the past century and a half devalued women’s textile labor in Asia?

Gendered Threads of Globalization: 20th c. Textile Crossings in Asia Pacific is made possible by generous contributions from the following:

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada;The Subir & Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, University of California, Berkeley;  The Pasold Research Fund, University of Edinburgh; and The Victoria Nikkei Cultural Society. From the University of Victoria, the following units are also contributors: The Orion Lecture Series in Fine Arts; the departments of Art History of Visual Studies and Gender Studies; schools of Humanities and Fine Arts: The Center for Asia Pacific Initiatives; The Center for the Study of Religion and Society; The Center for Global Studies; and The Office of the Associate Vice-President of Research.

The University of Victoria is on the land of the Lekwungen-speaking peoples who are today known as the Songhees, Esquimalt and WSÁNEĆ peoples. Their connection to the land has existed since time immemorial, and continues to resiliantly thrive despite generations of colonial violence.